Interracial dating common

S., the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882, and other restrictive regulations. Further, after the passage of the 1965 Immigration Act, many of these Asian war brides eventually helped to expand the Asian American community by sponsoring their family and other relatives to immigrate to the U. These days, Asian Americans in interracial relationships are very common. Census Bureau to construct the following table on marriage patterns among Asian Americans. 2011), the table shows the percentage of the six largest Asian ethnic groups who are married either endogamously (within their ethnic group), to another Asian (outside their ethnic group), or to someone who is White, Black, Hispanic/Latino, or someone who is Mixed-Race/Multiracial, by husbands and wives.

These laws actually made the situation worse because Asian men were no longer able to bring their wives over to the U. So in a way, those who wanted to become married had no other choice but to socialize with non-Asians. servicemen who fought and were stationed overseas in Asian countries began coming home with Asian "war brides." Data show that from 1945 into the 1970s, thousands of young women from China, Japan, South Korea, the Philippines, and later Viet Nam came to the U. One of the best research articles on this topic is a study conducted by Shinagawa and Pang entitled "Asian American Panethnicity and Intermarriage," reprinted in the highly recommended . The other major component of the table is that it presents different numbers depending on which statistical model is used.

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Nonetheless, what these stats tell us is that generally speaking, across all three models (calculated by using the admittedly unscientific method of averaging the proportions across all three models to emphasize the last two models), these are the Asian ethnic groups are most or least likely to have each kind of spouse: Men/Husbands -- Most / The numbers presented above only represent a 'cross sectional' look at racial/ethnic marriage patterns involving Asian Americans.

In other words, they only represent a 'snapshot' look using the latest data from 2010.

Nonetheless, it is important to recognize that such marriage patterns have evolved and changed over time.

In order to get a closer look at recent trends, we can compare these numbers to data from the 2006 Census.

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Last modified 19-Oct-2019 17:08